Business and society carroll pdf file

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business and society carroll pdf file

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Corporate social responsibility CSR is a type of international private business self-regulation [1] that aims to contribute to societal goals of a philanthropic, activist, or charitable nature by engaging in or supporting volunteering or ethically-oriented practices. While it has been considered a form of corporate self-regulation [4] for some time, over the last decade or so it has moved considerably from voluntary decisions at the level of individual organizations to mandatory schemes at regional, national, and international levels. Considered at the organisational level, CSR is generally understood as a strategic initiative that contributes to a brand's reputation. With some models, a firm's implementation of CSR goes beyond compliance with regulatory requirements and engages in "actions that appear to further some social good, beyond the interests of the firm and that which is required by law".

Test Bank for Business and Society 10th Edition by Carroll

Explain how corporate social responsibility CSR evolved and encompasses economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic components. Provide business examples of CSR and corporate citizenship. Differentiate between and among corporate citizenship, social responsibility, social responsiveness, social performance, and sustainability. Elaborate on the concept of corporate social performance CSP.

Explain how corporate citizenship develops in stages in companies. Describe the triple bottom line and its relevance to sustainability. An entire chapter is devoted to CSR concepts because it is a core idea that underlies most of the material in the textbook. This chapter also focuses on the concept of corporate citizenship. The current chapter focuses on the analytical tools we will be using rather than actually using those tools.

In some ways this distinction can be likened to a teenager learning how the steering wheel, brake, and accelerator work in a car, rather than actually getting behind the wheel and driving.

Of course, everyone would want a new driver to understand what the steering wheel does and which pedal to use when she needs to slow down. This is compounded by the fact that many students may have heard of or discussed the terms introduced in this chapter in other business courses, specifically corporate social responsibility, but they may not grasp that CSR requires the simultaneous execution of economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic.

Consequently, students in your class may not be as anxious to delve into the intricacies of corporate citizenship, including corporate social responsibility, corporate social responsiveness and corporate social performance when they could be discussing a juicy corporate scandal. But it is important that students have better tools to help them dissect corporate citizenship than just their gut feelings as they will encounter.

This chapter also is a good starting point for students to begin to focus on what they, as citizens, want from the business sector. Do they want corporations to simply recognize their various responsibilities to society, do they want them to make improvements, do they demand evidence that corporations are making improvements, or do they have more general concerns about the role business plays in society corporate citizenship? Economic Responsibilities 2. Legal Responsibilities 3.

Ethical Responsibilities 4. Philanthropic Responsibilities 5. The Pyramid of Corporate Social Responsibility a. Pyramid as a Unified Whole b. CSR in Practice in Business.

Arguments for CSR C. Broad Views B. Narrow Views C. Drivers of Corporate Citizenship D. Stages of Corporate Citizenship F. Global Corporate Citizenship G.

Corporate Citizenship Awards by Business Press. Perspective 1: socially responsible firms are more financially profitable 2. Perspective 3: there is an interactive relationship between and among social performance, financial performance, and corporate reputation B.

A Stakeholder Bottom-Line Perspective. Identify and discuss some of the tensions among the layers or components. According to Carroll, society has four expectations of a corporation—economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic. The pyramid shows the economic responsibility at the bottom, because it is the foundation upon which all others rest.

This is consistent with classical economic thought, which provides that management must maximize the profits of its owners.

Companies that repeatedly do not show a profit will see falling stock prices and eventual bankruptcy and may find it more difficult if not impossible to meet their legal, ethical and philanthropic responsibilities. Several companies in both the automotive and airline industries struggled to meet their economic responsibilities and landed in bankruptcy as a result. The second level is legal, because society requires corporations to follow the law, just as they are required to make a profit.

Companies can receive stiff penalties for breaking the law. In the last decade, hundreds of publicly-traded companies were investigated by federal regulatory agencies for abusive practices related to stock option grants and were subjected to penalties due to faulty accounting and public disclosures.

The third level is the ethical responsibility—society expects ethical behavior of companies. The corporate scandals that shaped the beginning of this century pointed out that society expects honest and fair reporting of financial operations by executives. If this expectation is violated, the executives can face criminal charges, as Martha Stewart and several Enron officials discovered.

More recently, executives in financial services firms have found themselves subject to public scrutiny for arguably unethical practices related to aggressive lending practices. On the other hand, companies may find themselves recognized for their ethical activities. Starbucks and the Timberland Company are often recognized for their ethical practices.

At the top is the philanthropic responsibility. Society desires this of corporations, but the company has discretion in whether it performs at this level or not. While the economic responsibility is the base of the pyramid, a CSR or stakeholder perspective would focus on the pyramid as a unified whole.

Companies are expected to fulfill their economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic responsibilities simultaneously, meaning that companies need to concurrently 1 make a profit, 2 obey the law, 3 be ethical and 4 be a good corporate citizen. While the simultaneous fulfillment of all four responsibilities can be challenging, the best moral managers will use.

Question: In your view, what is the single strongest argument against the idea of corporate social responsibility? What is the single strongest argument for corporate social responsibility? Briefly explain. Answer: There are few, if any, legitimate arguments against CSR.

That is, corporations should not be held responsible for providing funds and services for things that governments should be doing e. In circumstances in which profits and social welfare are in direct opposition, an appeal to corporate social responsibility will almost always be ineffective, because executives are unlikely to act voluntarily in the public interest and against shareholder interests. In a BusinessEthics.

Question: Differentiate between corporate social responsibility and corporate social responsiveness. Give an example of each. How does corporate social performance relate to these terms? Where do corporate citizenship and sustainability fit in? Corporate social responsiveness is a more proactive and action oriented concept, wherein business firms anticipate social expectations and meet them before they are imposed as a new responsibility on the company.

A corporation that obeys existing laws is displaying corporate social responsibility. An example of corporate social responsiveness would be a firm providing child care benefits to its working parents, thus responding to the reality of issues faced by working families. Corporate social performance focuses on what firms are actually able to accomplish — specifically, the outcomes or results of their acceptance of corporate social responsibility and implementation of corporate social responsiveness.

Corporate social performance includes a recognition of the four corporate responsibilities. Draw a schematic that shows how the two concepts relate to one another. Answer: The Triple Bottom Line provides results of operations in three inter-related fields—economic, social, and environmental. The CSR Pyramid recognizes four levels of responsibility—economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic.

Both models recognize the economic sphere. Question: Research two different companies and try to identify at which stage of corporate citizenship these companies reside. What are the best examples you can find of companies in Stage 5 of corporate citizenship? Answer: This question is left to the class instructor as time and events will have altered the facts available at the time this is being written. At the time of this writing, the author would suggest that students review the corporate social responsibility reports of Microsoft, Google, and the Walt Disney Company.

Question: Does socially responsible, sustainable, or ethical investing seem to you to be a legitimate way in which the averge citizen might demonstrate her or his concern for CSR? However, the fact that returns on ethical investing approximate market returns seems to downplay this view.

In addition, the vast majority of investments never reach the firm. Unless the firm is offering a new issue of stock, the proceeds of the sale go to the previous owner of the securities, not to the firm. Specifically, ask students to identify the criteria for socially responsible investments. Each group should be given a week to research firms for potential investment. Each group should track the return on their investments through the end of the semester and report the value of their portfolio at that time.

Opportunity should be given to discuss why certain investments were made. Instructors may want to provide some type of reward for the group with the greatest return on investment. Groups that select companies that do not meet the class social screen should be disqualified. Ask students to independently research academic and business responses to this article. Students should summarize the arguments for and against Corporate Social Responsibility based upon their review of Dr. Students then should state which argument that they find most persuasive and why.

See More. This is compounded by the fact that many students may have heard of or discussed the terms introduced in this chapter in other business courses, specifically corporate social responsibility, but they may not grasp that CSR requires the simultaneous execution of economic, legal, ethical and philanthropic responsibilities.

But it is important that students have better tools to help them dissect corporate citizenship than just their gut feelings as they will encounter business colleagues who will argue against and resist implementation of activities that emphasize corporate citizenship.

While the simultaneous fulfillment of all four responsibilities can be challenging, the best moral managers will use moral imagination to develop solutions to corporate dilemmas that meet all four responsibilities at the same time. Published on Nov 24, Go explore.

Business & Society: Ethics and Stakeholder Management

Explain how corporate social responsibility CSR evolved and encompasses economic, legal, ethical, and philanthropic components. Provide business examples of CSR and corporate citizenship. Differentiate between and among corporate citizenship, social responsibility, social responsiveness, social performance, and sustainability. Elaborate on the concept of corporate social performance CSP. Explain how corporate citizenship develops in stages in companies.

Corporate Social Responsibility CSR has come a long way, morphing from a nice thing to do to what it is today: a necessity for a successful business. Wealthy businessman and philanthropist Andrew Carnegie challenged wealthy people to support social causes, following his belief in the Gospel of Wealth. Rockefeller, taking inspiration from Carnegie, followed suit in donating more than half a billion dollars. Its purpose was to give power to the community by accepting gifts from multiple donors rather than one fortune, who could collectively assess needs and respond to the community. This was the first community foundation.

Corporate social responsibility

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Business & Society

Business & Society: Ethics and Stakeholder Management

The Journal of Business Ethics publishes only original articles from a wide variety of methodological and disciplinary perspectives concerning ethical issues related to business that bring something new or unique to the discourse in their field. From its inception the Journal has aimed to improve the human condition by providing a public forum for discussion and debate about ethical issues related to business. In order to promote a dialogue between the various interested groups as much as possible, papers are presented in a style relatively free of specialist jargon.

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june 13th, - business and society ethics sustainability and stakeholder management 10th edition carroll solutions manual free download as pdf file pdf text.


Test Bank for Business and Society 10th Edition by Carroll

It traces the origins of the concept and creates a theoretical framework for international use, thus having the benefit of applicability in both developing as well as developed economies. The models of Carroll and Visser are integrated to produce The International Pyramid Model of CSR, which acknowledges the relative importance of economic, glocal, legal and ethical, and philanthropic aspects of the CSR concept. Furthermore, it offers flexibility by acknowledging that the various responsibilities it embodies can shift up or down the pyramid as priorities change, which is inevitable as businesses and economies differ cross-sectionally, and over time. However, recent studies have suggested that this understanding of CSR and the way in which it is implemented differs across countries, and time, and that it is the various business communities that have determined the pace of evolution and development in this respect. In fact, CSR has been represented as an umbrella-term covering a diverse range of issues which have grown steadily in importance for business performance at a global level. Porter and Kramer , p. Hence, as noted by Maron , CSR is applicable in global contexts and a practicality to be absorbed by all businesses within their available resources.

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